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How titles are gained

Ever wondered what all those letters by the dogs name means. This page is dedicated to explaining in a how ANKC recognised dog titles are gained in Australia, and what the dogs are expected to do, and how hard it can be to attain. 

Please note this is intended as a guide only (mainly as information for overseas web surfers), for the complete up-to-date ANKC rules and regulations and  interpretation of those rules, handbooks are available from your local controlling body. 

Index: Click on your area of interest to go straight to that section, which will start at the first title for that particular discipline.
Conformation
Obedience
Tracking
Agility & Jumping
Retrieving & Field
Endurance Test

Dual Champion please note this is a guide only

The Dual Champion title is the hardest title to achieve. The dogs must gain an Australian Champion Title in showing plus either an Obedience Champion (O) , Retrieving Champion (R), Field Champion (F) or Tracking Champion (T) Titles. The type of Dual Champion is shown in brackets. For example a Dual Champion (O) has an Obedience Champion title as its second title, (R) (F) or (T) etc for the other disciplines. It is possible to become a Triple Champion but as yet no Munsterlanders have reached this level.

Australian Champion please note this is a guide only

To gain an Australian Champion title a dog must accumulate at least 100 challenge points. Since Jan 2000, 25 points must be gained after the dog is 12 months old. Thus a dog may have well over 100 points by the time it gains its title, once it has turned 12 months.

Judging of the dogs is a simple process. First all the dogs of each breed are split into dogs and bitches, then they are split by age. Commonly the classes are baby puppy (3 - 6 months), minor puppy (6 - 9 months), puppy (6 - 12 months), junior (9 - 18 months), intermediate (18 - 36 months), state bred - australian bred & open (6 months and over). 

Each dog is judged in a "stack" standing either in the position the handler puts the dog or free standing in the position that the dog stands naturally. The judge checks the dogs teeth, feels the dogs conformation, coat, musculation and if the dog is male that it is entire. Then the dogs are moved often in a triangle so the judge can view the dogs movement going away from them, in profile and coming back to them. Then the dogs in each age/sex class are placed. The first placed dog from each class over six months return to the ring after all the dogs of each sex is judged, these dogs them compete for best dog or best bitch, then runner up best dog and bitch. The best dog and bitch then compete for best of breed, with the runner up dog or bitch replacing the best of breed dog or bitch for runner up best of breed. Often the first placed dog and bitch of each age class are then judged for best of each class. Basically showing is a process of elimination until only one dog is left unbeaten this dog will end up being best exhibit in show. 

Challenge points are awarded to the best dog and bitch over 6 months of age at Championship shows. The number of points awarded depends on the number of dogs and bitches entered. The minimum number of points is six (6) the maximum is twenty five (25).  The number of points gained are five (5) points plus one (1) point for each dog of the same sex entered. Since January 2000 Best of Breed dogs get five (5) points plus one (1) point for each exhibit over the age of six (6) months shown on the day of that breed.

Example: At a show there is 5 dogs and 4 bitches all over 6 months. The Dog Challenge winner shall be awarded a ten (10) point challenge. The Bitch Challenge winner shall be awarded a nine (9) point challenge.
Since Jan 2000 the Best of Breed winner shall be awarded fourteen (14) points instead of their original 10 or 9 points. Prior to this date they would only get the original 10 or 9 points.
Should this Best of Breed dog then go on to win Best Exhibit in Group it will then be awarded twenty five (25) points instead of the Best of Breed fourteen (14) points (assuming there was at least nineteen (19) entries in the entire group)

The number of Championship shows varies from state to state, in New South Wales and  Victoria there can be up to two Championship shows on offer per day, and there are usually shows on both days of most weekends. This means their can be over 100 sets of Challenge points on offer per year to Large Munsterlanders. In South Australia there are less shows and this would average out to two shows per fortnight or about 50 sets of challenges per year. Unlike the UK there are challenges for all recognised breeds at all Championship show unless in some states if there is a Breed Specialty show being held in the same day & state, in which case that breed will not be awarded challenges. 

In the early days (late eighties and early nineties) Large Munsterlanders gained their titles with seventeen (17) six (6) point challenges. I.e.: they gained their titles with little to no competition. Their greatest fear was being refused a challenge by a judge who did not know enough about the breed. In South Australia in 1998 we peaked at an average of ten (10) Munsterlanders per show, now days there are only 3 or 4 per show. In Victoria there is often no Munsterlanders shown, one at the most will come out. In Queensland there are only 1 or 2 Munsterlanders shown, and in the other states apart from Royal Shows no Munsterlanders are shown. 

Royal Shows are the greatest drawcards for entries, the 1994 Melbourne Royal got the biggest entry so far with eleven (11) dogs and twelve (12) bitches entered, Best of Breed going to Ch Ratek Lord of the Manor. The second largest show the 1996 Melbourne Royal attracted nine (9) dogs and eleven (11) bitches, with Best of Breed going to Ch Mistypoint Black Raven ET. In recent years fourteen (14) to sixteen (16) entries are more normal with the Melbourne Royal always gaining more entries than the Adelaide Royal. All other states get between one (1) and four (4) entries.  

Australian Grand Champion please note this is a guide only

The Australian Grand Champion title takes much more time than the Champion title. Dogs must accumulate one thousand (1000) challenge points, with at least one challenge being awarded after the 1st of January 1998 (the year the title was introduced). The rules for gaining the points are exactly the same as for the Champion title.

The rules are under review at present with some people feeling that it is too easy to attain since it is theoretically possible to gain the title without beating another dog. Unfortunately suggestions of multiple Best in Show winners only would discount the majority of unrecognised breeds as they rarely are awarded Best in Group much less Best in Show. To date the only Munsterlander to go BIS at a Championship show is Ch Dawsons Munster Brav, Grand Champion Mistypoint Falcons Image CD ADX JD ET is the only other dog to have come close with multiple Best Exhibit in Groups.  

Australian Obedience Champion please note this is a guide only

Prior to the 1st of January 2000:
To be awarded an Obedience Champion title the dog has to have been granted both a Utility Dog title (after gaining a Companion Dog and Companion Dog Excellent title) and a Tracking Dog Excellent title (after gaining a Tracking Dog title). It was very difficult to achieve as the dogs had to be able to do both Obedience and be able to Track. For details on how each title can be gained see the individual titles listed below. 

Since the 1st of January 2000:
To be awarded an Obedience Champion title since January 2000 the dog must after it has gained a Utility Dog title pass a further five (5) Utility trials (not counting any passes prior to Jan 2000) with  scores of 185 points or better with three (3) 1st places under at least two different  judges. No Tracking is required now for this title, this has been made a separate title.

Companion Dog please note this is a guide only

All Obedience Trials (except non titled training classes of Graduate 1 & 11) are scored out of two hundred (200) points. To attain a pass the dog must score at least 170 points out of the 200 points without having more than 50% of the maximum points deducted for any one exercise. Three qualifying scores under at least two different judges will gain the dog a title.

In Novice the exercises are as follows:
Heel on lead                         30 points
The dog must heel on a loose lead  through a "heel pattern" sequence as called by the judge. This will include left & right turns, about turns, a figure eight around human posts and sits, stands & drops all executed in normal, fast & slow pace. Points are lost for lagging, pulling bumping or working wide and all missed positions (sits, stands & drops). Failing to complete the same position 3 times will result in failing the exercise. Dogs must gain at least 15 points to pass the exercise.

Stand for Examination      20 points
The dog must heel forward on a loose lead, stand when commanded to and stay as the handler moves in front of the dog to the end of the lead, then it must stay still whilst the judge runs their hands over the dog. The dog must remain in the stand position until the hander has returned to the heel position after the judge has finished the examination. Points are lost for bad heeling, not standing on the first command, moving feet, undue shyness or aggression. Moving all four feet will result in failing the exercise.

Heel Free                              40 points
The dog will is required to complete the same heel pattern as was completed in the Heel on Lead section, the only difference is the lead is removed for this exercise. Points are deducted for the same faults as in Heel on Lead, with an additional deduction for cutting the figure eight.

Stand Stay                           20 points
Off lead the dog is required to heel forward and stand when commanded by the handler when they are directed by the judge. The dog must then stay in the stand position whilst the handler leaves the dog at a distance of at least five (5) metres. Whilst the handler is away from the dog the judge will circle the dog  once approx 1 metre away. The handler will then return to the heel position. Points are deducted for bad heeling, not standing on the first command, moving feet, undue shyness or aggression. Moving all four feet and breaking the stay will result in failing the exercise.

Recall                                    30 points
Off lead the dog is required to heel forward and automatically sit when the handler is directed to halt by the judge. The handler will then command the dog to wait or stay and leave the dog to a distance of at least twelve (12) metres as directed by the judge. Again on the judges command the handler will call the dog, which must come immediately and sit in front of the handler. When commanded to the dog must then return to the heel position. Points are deducted for bad heeling, failing to sit in either of the three sits, returning to the heel position before commanded and slow responses to the come command. Breaking the sit before commanded or not coming on the first call will result in failing the exercise.

1 minute sit stay                 30 points
This is an off lead group exercise with up to ten dogs in the line up. Each handler has a stay peg allocated to them. The dogs are lined up next to their stay pegs in the sit position. When directed the handlers all tell their dogs to stay and leave their dogs to a distance of at least twelve (12) meters. The dogs and handlers must then remain in those positions facing each other for a period of one full minute, after which the handlers will return to the heel position. Points are deducted for the handlers leaving or returning separate from the rest of the group, or if the dog fidgets, whinges or barks. Breaking the sit position or moving more than a half a body length from where it was left will result in failing the exercise.

3 minute Down Stay          30 points
This is an off lead group exercise with up to ten dogs in the line up. Each handler has a stay peg allocated to them. The dogs are lined up next to their stay pegs in the down/drop  position. When directed the handlers all tell their dogs to stay and leave their dogs to a distance of at least twelve (12) meters. The dogs and handlers must then remain in those positions facing each other for a period of three full minutes, after which the handlers will return to the heel position. Points are deducted for the handlers leaving or returning separate from the rest of the group, or if the dog fidgets, whinges or barks. Breaking the down/drop position (including rolling over leaving "daylight" under the dog)  or moving more than a half a body length from where it was left will result in failing the exercise.

Total                                     200 points
At the end of all the exercises the dogs must have at least 170 points out of the 200 points in order to pass, without having more than 50% deducted for any one exercise. Scores of 185 or greater are considered very good scores, some clubs even give "excellent medallions" for scores over 190. Three passes at this level will give you a Companion Dog title.

Companion Dog Excellent please note this is a guide only

All Obedience Trials (except non titled training classes of Graduate 1 & 11) are scored out of two hundred (200) points. To attain a pass the dog must score at least 170 points out of the 200 points without having more than 50% of the maximum points deducted for any one exercise. Three qualifying scores under at least two different judges will gain the dog a title.

In Open the exercises are as follows:

Heel Free                                                      30 points
The dog must heel off lead  through a "heel pattern" sequence as called by the judge. This will include left & right turns, about turns, a figure eight around human posts and sits, stands & drops all executed in normal, fast & slow pace. Points are lost for lagging, pulling bumping or working wide and all missed positions (sits, stands & drops). Failing to complete the same position 3 times, cutting the figure eight and not leaving  from the start peg will result in failing the exercise. Dogs must gain at least 15 points to pass the exercise.

Stand Free for Examination                    20 points
The dog must heel forward off lead, stand when commanded  and stay as the handler moves in front of the dog to a distance of at least five (5) metres, then it must stay still whilst the judge runs their hands over the dog. The dog must remain in the stand position until the hander has returned to the heel position after the judge has finished the examination. Points are lost for bad heeling, not standing on the first command, moving feet, undue shyness or aggression. Moving all four feet will result in failing the exercise.

Drop on Recall                                           30 points
Off lead the dog is required to heel forward and automatically sit when the handler is directed to halt by the judge. The handler will then command the dog to wait or stay and leave the dog to a distance of at least twelve (12) metres as directed by the judge. On the judges command the handler will call the dog, which must come immediately. Approximately half way to the handler the judge will direct the handler to drop their dog, the dog must then drop from a run and stay until it is called a second time from the handler, it must come and sit in front of the handler. When commanded to the dog must then return to the heel position. Points are deducted for bad heeling, failing to sit in either of the three sits, returning to the heel position before commanded, anticipating the drop command and slow responses to the come or drop command. Breaking the sit before commanded, not coming on the first call or not dropping  will result in failing the exercise.

Retrieve Dumbbell on Flat                         20 points
Off lead the dog is required to heel forward and sit automatically when the handler is directed to halt by the judge. On the judges direction the handler must throw their dumbbell at least 6 metres away. The handler is then directed to send their dog, the dog is told to fetch. With that the dog must run out pick up the dumbbell bring it back at the same pace and sit in front of the handler. When directed the handler commands the dog to "give" up the dumbbell, and once told return to the heel position. Points can be deducted for bad heeling, mouthing the dumbbell, dropping the dumbbell, returning at a slower pace, missed sits, or not finishing. Breaking before commanded to fetch, not fetching and not delivering to hand will all result in failing the exercise.

Retrieve Dumbbell over High Jump        30 points
Off lead the dog is required to heel forward and sit automatically when the handler is directed to halt by the judge. On the judges direction the handler must throw their dumbbell over a jump (solid upright boards set at the dogs shoulder height) at least 4 metres past the jump. The handler is then directed to send their dog, the dog is told to fetch. With that the dog must run out over the jump pick up the dumbbell bring it back over the hump at the same pace and sit in front of the handler. When directed the handler commands the dog to "give" up the dumbbell, and once told return to the heel position. Points can be deducted for bad heeling, mouthing the dumbbell, dropping the dumbbell, returning at a slower pace, missed sits, or not finishing. Breaking before commanded to fetch, not jumping the jump in both directions, not fetching and not delivering to hand will all result in failing the exercise.

Broad Jump                                                20 points
The handler is directed to take up their position in front of the broad jump (the broad jump is a series of flat jumps made up of boards on an angle set at a jump width of twice the dogs shoulder height). When directed the handler leaves the dog and stands beside the jump. On the handlers command the dog must jump straight across the jump without cutting the corner of the jump in a straight line to the handler, once landed the dog must run around the jump and sit in front of the handler. When directed by the judge the handler will command the dog to return to the heel position. 

3 Minute Sit Stay Out of Site                   25 points
This is an off lead group exercise with up to ten dogs in the line up. Each handler has a stay peg allocated to them. The dogs are lined up next to their stay pegs in the sit position. When directed the handlers all tell their dogs to stay and leave their dogs following the steward to a blind outside the ring area where the dogs can not see the handler. The handlers must then remain out of site for a period of three full minutes, after which the handlers will return to the heel position. Points are deducted for the handlers leaving or returning separate from the rest of the group, or if the dog fidgets, whinges or barks. Breaking the sit position or moving more than a half a body length from where it was left will result in failing the exercise.

5 Minute Down Stay Out of Site             25 points
This is an off lead group exercise with up to ten dogs in the line up. Each handler has a stay peg allocated to them. The dogs are lined up next to their stay pegs in the down/drop  position. When directed the handlers all tell their dogs to stay and leave their dogs following the steward to a blind outside the ring area where the dogs can not see the handler.  The handlers must then remain out of site for a period of five full minutes, after which the handlers will return to the heel position. Points are deducted for the handlers leaving or returning separate from the rest of the group, or if the dog fidgets, whinges or barks. Breaking the down/drop position (including rolling over leaving "daylight" under the dog)  or moving more than a half a body length from where it was left will result in failing the exercise.

Total                                                            200 points
At the end of all the exercises the dogs must have at least 170 points out of the 200 points in order to pass, without having more than 50% deducted for any one exercise. Scores of 185 or greater are considered very good scores, some clubs even give "excellent medallions" for scores over 190. Three passes at this level will give you a Companion Dog Excellent title.

Utility Dog please note this is a guide only

All Obedience Trials (except non titled training classes of Graduate 1 & 11) are scored out of two hundred (200) points. To attain a pass the dog must score at least 170 points out of the 200 points without having more than 50% of the maximum points deducted for any one exercise. Three qualifying scores under at least two different judges will gain the dog a title.

In Utility the exercises are as follows:

Seek back                                                     30 points
The handler brings into the ring a small article (often made of leather). This is surrendered to either the judge or the steward.
The dog must heel off lead  through a simple "heel pattern" sequence as called by the judge. At some stage through the heel pattern the judge or steward will place the article on the track where the handler has walked. At least 20 metres past the article the judge will direct the handler to about turn and halt. From this point the dog will be directed to find the article. This can be done by either sight or scent. The dog will be allowed to seek for as long a needed as long as it is deemed to be "working" all the time, however points may be deducted for lack of interest. Once the article is found it must be promptly returned to the handler.  The dog must  sit in front of the handler. When directed the handler commands the dog to "give" up the article, and once told return to the heel position. Points can be deducted for bad heeling, mouthing the article,  returning at a slower pace, missed sits, or not finishing. Breaking before commanded to find, not finding the article & not delivering to hand will all result in failing the exercise.

Directed jumping                                        40 points
This exercise is made up of two parts, one being a directed jump over a bar jump, the other being a directed jump over a solid jump. Both jumps are set to the shoulder height of the dog, and the judge decides which jump is executed first.
The ring is set up in the following manner:
                                                                           "box"
                                                                                |
                                                                             25m  
                                                                                |
                                                     bar jump-----7.5m------solid jump
                                                                                |
                                                                                |
                                                                         handler  
The handler in each part is told to take up the position chosen by the judge at least 25 metres from the "box". On order from the judge the handler sends the dogs to the "box". The dog must run straight to the box, about turn, then sit facing the hander. The handler can not tell the dog to sit, the entire dog must be within the prescribed area (which is a 1.5 metre square "box" made from 25mm PVC piping). The judge will then indicate to the handler which jump will be negotiated first. On command the dog must jump the directed jump then return to hander and sit square in front. On the final command the dog must return to the heel position "finish" and sit. This entire exercise will the be repeated for the second jump. Points will be deducted for slow responses, failing to sit in front of the handler or on the finish and clipping the jumps. Not sitting in the box, sitting outside or partly outside the box, jumping the wrong jump, knocking off the jump and anticipating the call will result in failing the exercise. Failing either jump will result in failing the entire exercise. 

Scent discrimination                                 45 points
This exercise is made up of three parts, finding the correct wooden article, the correct leather article and finding the correct metal article. The handler will bring into the ring a set of 15 numbered articles (5 wood, 5 leather & 5 metal).  All the articles bar one of each variety are spread out on either the ground/lawn or a plastic mat at the choice of the handler. One of each article is selected kept aside. The remaining 12 are spread out by the steward on the ground or mat by hand at least 150mm apart. The handler can choose the order in which the dog is required to find the articles. The judge records the numbers of the retained articled which will be held by the handler for a few seconds prior to starting each part, this is to impart their scent on the article so the dog can find it. The scented article is placed with the other 12 articles using tongs so only the handlers scent will be on it. In each part of the exercise the following steps will be taken:
The handler and dog will sit facing the judge at least 5 metres from the articles. This is facing in the opposite direction to the articles. The hander selects one of the articles, shows the judge the number then imparts their scent on it. When directed the article is surrendered to the judge or steward who will place the article amongst the other articles using tongs.  On command from the judge the handler & dog will about turn to face the articles, on further direction the handler will instruct the dog to retrieve the correct article. The dog must go straight to the articles and sniff out the correct one, pick it up and return to the handler sitting in front. When directed the handler commands the dog to "give" up the article, and once told return to the heel position.  The handler must then show the judge the number on the article, which must match the number previously recorded.  Points can be deducted for bad heeling, mouthing the article,  returning at a slow pace, missed sits, or not finishing. Breaking before commanded to find, not finding the correct article & not delivering to hand will all result in failing the exercise. Failing any of the three parts will result in failing the entire exercise.

Signal exercise                                           30 points
The dog must heel off lead  through a "heel pattern" sequence as called by the judge. This will include left & right turns, about turns, sits, stands & drops all executed in normal, fast & slow pace. All positions must be completed without the handler giving any verbal commands. Points are lost for lagging, pulling bumping or working wide and all missed positions (sits, stands & drops).  At the end of the heel pattern the handler will be instructed to stand the dog, then stay and leave the dog to a distance of at least five metres at which point they will be told to about turn and face the dog. The hander will then be commanded to put the dog through the following series of positions from the stand position, first the dog must drop, then sit up from the drop, then come to the handler and sit in front of the handler. Finally the dog must return to the heel position. Dogs which require verbal commands, break the positions in the last section or move more than half a body length whilst changing positions will fail the exercise.

Optional exercise                                       20 points
Handlers get to choose one of the following three exercises.
A) Speak on command
This exercise is completed in three parts, each part is exactly the same except for the position the dog is in when it is required to speak on command, the first part is in the sit position, then the stand position and finally the down position.
On the direction of the judge the handler must heel the dog forwards and command the dog to either sit, stand or drop. When directed by the judge the handler will leave the dog going at least 5 metres in front of the dog where they will be directed to about turn and halt facing the dog. On the direction from the judge they must command the dog to bark. The handler will then return to the heel position. This will be repeated for each of the positions. Points will be deducted for repeated commands to sit, stand or drop,  failing to speak when commanded or breaking the position will result in failing that part. Failing any part will result in failing the entire exercise.

B) Food refusal
This exercise is completed in three parts, each part is exactly the same except for the position the dog is in when it is required to refuse the food, the first part is in the sit position, then the stand position and finally the down position. The food offered must be three different types and may be cooked or raw meat, canned food, cheese, cake, milk etc.
On the direction of the judge the handler must heel the dog forwards and command the dog to either sit, stand or drop. When directed by the judge the handler will leave the dog going at least 5 metres in front of the dog where they will be directed halt. The judge will then offer the dog "food" either by hand or in a container.  The dog may sniff the food but not lick or eat the food. the judge is not permitted speak or force the dog to eat.  The handler will then return to the heel position. This will be repeated for each of the positions. Points will be deducted for repeated commands to sit, stand or drop,  licking or eating the food, or breaking the position will result in failing that part. Failing any part will result in failing the entire exercise.

C) Directed retrieve
This exercise is one part only.  Three white cotton gardening gloves are placed on the ground approximately 6 metres apart  in a straight line. These gloves are numbered 1, 2 and 3. The judge decides which glove is to be retrieved. 
The handler is required to take up a position at least twelve metres from the row of gloves in front of the centre glove, but facing away from the gloves. The dog must be sitting. Once the gloves are placed out by the steward the judge will nominate 1, 2 or 3 glove to the handler who will then do an about turn with the dog to face the nominated glove, the dog must again sit at heel. The judge will then order the handler to send the dog to fetch the glove. The dog must briskly go out and fetch the correct glove, and return to the handler at the same pace and sit in front of the handler. When directed the handler commands the dog to "give" up the glove, and once told return to the heel position. Points can be deducted for mouthing the glove, playing with the glove, returning at a slower pace, missed sits, or not finishing. Breaking before commanded to fetch, not fetching, fetching the wrong glove and not delivering to hand will all result in failing the exercise. 

Group examination                                   10 points
This is an off lead group exercise with up to ten dogs in the line up. Each handler has a stay peg allocated to them. The dogs are lined up next to their stay pegs in the stand position. When directed the handlers all tell their dogs to stay and leave their dogs to a distance of at least  five (5) metres, then it must stay still whilst the judge runs their hands over the dog. The dog must remain in the stand position until the hander has returned to the heel position after the judge has finished the examination on all the dogs in the group. Points are lost for bad heeling, not standing on the first command, moving feet, undue shyness or aggression. Moving all four feet will result in failing the exercise.

10 Minute down stay out of site             25 points
This is an off lead group exercise with up to ten dogs in the line up. Each handler has a stay peg allocated to them. The dogs are lined up next to their stay pegs in the down/drop  position. When directed the handlers all tell their dogs to stay and leave their dogs following the steward to a blind outside the ring area where the dogs can not see the handler.  The handlers must then remain out of site for a period of ten full minutes, after which the handlers will return to the heel position. Points are deducted for the handlers leaving or returning separate from the rest of the group, or if the dog fidgets, whinges or barks. Breaking the down/drop position (including rolling over leaving "daylight" under the dog)  or moving more than a half a body length from where it was left will result in failing the exercise.

Total                                                            200 points
At the end of all the exercises the dogs must have at least 170 points out of the 200 points in order to pass, without having more than 50% deducted for any one exercise. Scores of 185 or greater are considered very good scores, some clubs even give "excellent medallions" for scores over 190. Three passes at this level will give you a Utility Dog  title.

Tracking Champion please note this is a guide only

To obtain a tracking champion title the dog is required to have gained its Tracking Dog Excellent title. The final track Test 6 can not be attempted with out this title.  During the course of the tests the dogs are to be on a harness with a lead of at least ten metres. 
The track is laid out by either the judge or a steward a minimum of  6 hours prior to the test so their scent will dissipate. As they lay the track flags are placed out so the tracklayer knows where to walk as they lay the track for the dog. Articles are placed on the track belonging to the tracklayer, one at the beginning of the test the others as directed by the judge. These articles are to be with the tracklayer at least 30 minutes prior to being placed on the track so they may impart their scent on them. 
A minimum of 90 minutes and a maximum of 180 minutes before the test commences, the track will be walked by the tracklayer, who will collect the flags as they go, leaving only the start flag, and placing the articles as directed. Once they have finished walking the track they will wait quietly until they are found by the dog. Even finding the tracklayer does not guarantee a pass the dog must be deemed to be working and find the required number of articles.

Test 6 - Unknown Person
The dog shall follow a trail for approximately 1100 metres, the tracklayer shall be unknown to the dog.
The track will have at least six angle turns two turns to be acute of no less than 45 degrees and three articles must be placed on the track. Approximately 30 minutes prior to the commencement of the test the track must be crossed in two places by either one or two unknown people. At least two of the three articles must be found or indicated, the diversion tracks must be ignored and the tracklayer must be found at the end of the test to obtain a pass. The dog will be marked as Pass, Good, Very Good or Excellent for a Pass or Fail if the dog is unsuccessful.
                                 

Tracking Dog please note this is a guide only

To obtain a tracking dog title the dog is required to pass two tests, known as Test 1 and Test 2. Test 1 must be passed before Test 2 can be attempted. The pass for each test must be obtained by a different judge. 
During the course of the tests the dogs are to be on a harness with a lead of at least ten metres.
 The track is laid out by either the judge or a steward a minimum of  6 hours prior to the test so their scent will dissipate. As they lay the track flags are placed out so the tracklayer knows where to walk as they lay the track for the dog. Articles are placed on the track belonging to the tracklayer, one at the beginning of the test the others as directed by the judge. These articles are to be with the tracklayer at least 30 minutes prior to being placed on the track so they may impart their scent on them. They should be no bigger than a sock and inconspicuous in colour. 
 A minimum of 30 minutes and a maximum of 60 minutes before the test commences the track will be walked by the tracklayer, who will collect the flags as they go, leaving only the start flag, and placing the articles as directed. Once they have finished walking the track they will wait quietly until they are found by the dog. 
Even finding the tracklayer does not guarantee a pass the dog must be deemed to be working and find the required number of articles.
Any amount of time can be taken to find the tracklayer as long as the dog is deemed to be working and on the track. If required the handler may allow the dog to sniff the article from the start of the track, to remember the scent it is tracking, however the judge may penalise such instances.
A "known person" is anyone known to the dog, owner, friend etc. An "unknown person" is not known to the dog and can not have been used in a track for the dog for at least 6 months. The unknown person shall not be made known to the handler prior to the test. 

Test 1 - Known Person
The dog shall follow a trail for approximately 800 metres, the tracklayer shall be nominated by the handler.
The track will have at least two angle turns and two articles must be placed on the track. At least one of the two articles must be found or indicated, plus the tracklayer must be found at the end of the test to obtain a pass. The dog will be marked as Pass, Good, Very Good or Excellent for a Pass or Fail if the dog is unsuccessful.

Test 2 - Unknown Person
The dog shall follow a trail for approximately 800 metres, the tracklayer shall be unknown to the dog.
The track will have at least two angle turns and two articles must be placed on the track. At least one of the two articles must be found or indicated, plus the tracklayer must be found at the end of the test to obtain a pass. The dog will be marked as Pass, Good, Very Good or Excellent for a Pass or Fail if the dog is unsuccessful.

Tracking Dog Excellent please note this is a guide only

To obtain a tracking dog excellent  title the dog is required to pass three tests, known as Test 3, Test 4 and Test 5. Test 3 must be passed before Test 4 can be attempted and Test 4 passed before Test 5 can be attempted. The passes for the three tests must be obtained with at least two different judges. During the course of the tests the dogs are to be on a harness with a lead of at least ten metres. The track is laid out by either the judge or a steward a minimum of  6 hours prior to the test so their scent will dissipate. As they lay the track flags are placed out so the tracklayer knows where to walk as they lay the track for the dog. Articles are placed on the track belonging to the tracklayer, one at the beginning of the test the others as directed by the judge. These articles are to be with the tracklayer at least 30 minutes prior to being placed on the track so they may impart their scent on them. A minimum of 60 minutes and a maximum of 120 minutes (180 minutes in Test 5) before the test commences, the track will be walked by the tracklayer, who will collect the flags as they go, leaving only the start flag, and placing the articles as directed. Once they have finished walking the track they will wait quietly until they are found by the dog. Even finding the tracklayer does not guarantee a pass the dog must be deemed to be working and find the required number of articles.

Test 3 - Unknown Person
The dog shall follow a trail for approximately 1000 metres, the tracklayer shall be unknown to the dog.
The track will have at least four angle turns and two articles must be placed on the track. At least one of the two articles must be found or indicated, plus the tracklayer must be found at the end of the test to obtain a pass. The dog will be marked as Pass, Good, Very Good or Excellent for a Pass or Fail if the dog is unsuccessful.

Test 4 - Unknown Person
The dog shall follow a trail for approximately 1000 metres, the tracklayer shall be unknown to the dog.
The track will have at least four angle turns and two articles must be placed on the track. Approximately 30 minutes prior to the commencement of the test the track must be crossed once by a known person. At least one of the two articles must be found or indicated, the diversion track must be ignored and the tracklayer must be found at the end of the test to obtain a pass. The dog will be marked as Pass, Good, Very Good or Excellent for a Pass or Fail if the dog is unsuccessful.

Test 5 - Unknown Person
The dog shall follow a trail for approximately 1200 metres, the tracklayer shall be unknown to the dog.
The track will have at least five angle turns and three articles must be placed on the track. Approximately 30 minutes prior to the commencement of the test the track must be crossed twice by either one or two unknown people. At least two of the three articles must be found or indicated, the diversion tracks must be ignored and the tracklayer must be found at the end of the test to obtain a pass. The dog will be marked as Pass, Good, Very Good or Excellent for a Pass or Fail if the dog is unsuccessful.

Agility Dog please note this is a guide only

Dogs must be at least 18 months old to compete. 
In Novice Agility there are 10 -12 pieces of equipment used, each obstacle can only be negotiated once. To gain a title you need to qualify in three trials under at least two different judges. 
A qualification is obtained by finishing the course within the standard course time without picking up any course faults, this is known as a clear round. 
The standard course time is based on a "rate per metre"  by the number of metres to be covered by the dog, plus five seconds for the time on the table. Eg a course of 100 metres with a SCT of 2.5 mps would mean the dog must complete the course within 45 seconds. Common rates for SCT in novice range between 1.8 - 2.5 metres per second.
All course faults incur a 5 second penalty including refusals. Three refusals will result in disqualification, as will the handler bumping the dog to make it take the correct obstacle. Taking an obstacle out of order will incur a fault.
The dogs are split into three groups depending on their size, small dogs are up to 380mm (dogs such as Shetland Sheepdogs), medium dogs are from 380 to 550mm (such as Border Collies and Kelpies)  and large dogs are over 550mm (such as German Shepherds and Munsterlanders). The equipment used is as follows:

Mandatory Obstacles:
aframegreengold.gif (2961 bytes) Scramble - the dog must run up the a-frame go over the top and touch the coloured section on the way down this area is 1100mm up the both sides. Missing the colour on the way down only will incur a fault, missing the obstacle or not making it over the peak will incur a refusal.

Dog walk - The walk is made up of three planks 300 - 330mm wide, the up and down planks are 2500mm long the centre plank is 3500mm long and 1200mm from the ground. At each end of the walk there are three coloured sections red from the start to 450mm, yellow from 450mm to 900mm and blue from 900mm to 1100mm.  Small dogs must touch the red section. medium dogs must touch the red or yellow sections and large dogs must touch either red, yellow or blue on both the way up and the way down. Missing the colours will incur a fault, missing both sets incurs two faults not attempting the obstacle will result in a refusal being called.

longjumpgreengold.gif (2947 bytes) Broad jump - this jump can be made up of three boards (total width 800mm) for small dogs, 4 boards (total width 1200mm) for medium dogs and 5 boards (total width 1500mm) for large dogs. Each board is on an angle getting progressively higher with the largest boards maximum height being 250mm. They can be arranged from smallest to highest or the highest board can be in the middle with the slope going both ways for jumping in both directions. The dogs must cross the jump from the front, between the two poles and exiting between the back two poles. Faults are incurred for dislodging the boards or cutting across the boards (not exiting between the back poles). A refusal will be incurred for not attempting the jump or entering from the side (not entering between the front poles).

lolgreengold.gif (2434 bytes)Hoop - Hoops can be either in the form of a lollypop or held within a solid box. The inside diameter of the hoop must be 440mm and the inside must be filled in to avoid the dogs catching their paws. The heights are set at 380mm for small dogs, 570mm for medium dogs and 700mm for large dogs. Missing the jump will incur a refusal.

Spread hurdle - this jump is made up of two bar hurdles. For small dogs the bars are 300mm apart with bar heights of 300mm and 380mm, medium dogs are 450mm apart with bar heights of 450mm and 570mm, for large dogs the bars are 600mm apart with bar heights of 550mm and 700mm. Dislodging the bars will incur a fault missing the jump will result in a refusal being called. 

tablegreengold.gif (2737 bytes)
Table - this obstacle has a 1 metre exclusion zone that the handler may not enter whilst the dog is negotiating the obstacle. The table is 1 metre square with a non slip surface. Table heights are set at 380mm for small dogs, 570mm for medium dogs and 700mm for large dogs. The dogs must jump up onto the table then remain there for 5 full seconds, jumping off the table early will result in a fault plus the dog must get back on the table for a full 5 seconds, a fault will also be given if the handler enters the exclusion zone. If the dog does not jump on the table it will be called a refusal. 

Weaving poles - this obstacle has a 1 metre exclusion zone that the handler may not enter whilst the dog is negotiating the obstacle. There are eight poles in novice set 600mm apart. The poles are 1500mm high and 20 to 40mm in diameter. In novice the dogs can enter the first gap from either side and must weave their way through all the gaps, each gap missed will incur a fault.

Optional Obstacles:
hurdlegreengold.gif (2066 bytes)Hurdles can be either single bar jumps and solid jumps or in a set called a triple jump (bar - solid - bar jump) - The heights are set at 380mm for small dogs, 570mm for medium dogs and 700mm for large dogs. In the case of single jumps if the bar or any of the solid planks are dislodged the dog will incur a fault, if the dog does not attempt the jump it will be called a refusal.
The triple jump is harder as the dog must do all three jumps in order without dislodging any part of the jump, a fault can be incurred for each part of the jump.

coltulgreengold.gif (3141 bytes)Collapsible tunnel - this tunnel is made from a 44 gallon drum with both ends removed with a four metre "tail" often made of canvas or tarpaulin. The dogs must enter the drum and pass through the tail which will be lying flat on the ground, causing the dogs to push through to get out. Once inside the tunnel the dogs can only exit via the tail turning around and coming out the drum will result in a refusal being called, as will not entering the drum at all. 

bendgreengold2.gif (3561 bytes) Flexible tunnel - this tunnel is made from a concertina type tube a minimum of 3 metres to 6 metres with both ends open. The tunnel is flexible and can be shaped or straight. The dogs must enter through one end as chosen by the judge and exit the other end. 

If the dog negotiates all the obstacles without incurring any course faults, and the handler does not  infringe any exclusion zones or touch the dog or equipment, and the dog crosses the finish line within the standard course time then the dog will have a clear round and shall obtain a qualification towards a title.

Once a dog has three qualifications under at least two different judges the dog will be awarded the title of Agility Dog and may no longer compete in novice. 

Agility Dog Excellent please note this is a guide only

Dogs must be at least 18 months old to compete, and must have gained an AD title. 
In Open Agility there are 14 -16 pieces of equipment used, contact obstacles & weavers can only be negotiated once, all other obstacles can be negotiated as many times as the judge choses. To gain a title you need to qualify in five trials under at least two different judges. 
A qualification is obtained by finishing the course within the standard course time without picking up any course faults, this is known as a clear round. 
The standard course time is based on a "rate per metre"  by the number of metres to be covered by the dog, plus five seconds for the time on the table. Eg a course of 100 metres with a SCT of 2.5 mps would mean the dog must complete the course within 45 seconds.
Common rates for SCT in open range between 2.5 - 2.8 metres per second.
All course faults incur a 5 second penalty including refusals. Three refusals will result in disqualification, as will the handler bumping the dog to make it take the correct obstacle. Taking an obstacle out of order will incur a fault.
The dogs are split into three groups depending on their size, small dogs are up to 380mm (dogs such as Shetland Sheepdogs), medium dogs are from 380 to 550mm (such as Border Collies and Kelpies)  and large dogs are over 550mm (such as German Shepherds and Munsterlanders). The equipment used is as follows:

Mandatory Obstacles:
aframegreengold.gif (2961 bytes) Scramble - this obstacle is made up of two planks 2500mm long and 900mm wide. The dog must run up the a-frame go over the top and touch the coloured section on the way down this area is 1100mm up the both sides. Missing the colour on the way down only will incur a fault, missing the obstacle or not making it over the peak will incur a refusal.

Dog walk - The walk is made up of three planks 300 - 330mm wide, the up and down planks are 2500mm long the centre plank is 3500mm long and 1200mm from the ground. At each end of the walk there are three coloured sections red from the start to 450mm, yellow from 450mm to 900mm and blue from 900mm to 1100mm.  Small dogs must touch the red section. medium dogs must touch the red or yellow sections and large dogs must touch either red, yellow or blue on both the way up and the way down. Missing the colours will incur a fault, missing both sets incurs two faults not attempting the obstacle will result in a refusal being called.

longjumpgreengold.gif (2947 bytes) Broad jump - this jump can be made up of three boards (total width 800mm) for small dogs, 4 boards (total width 1200mm) for medium dogs and 5 boards (total width 1500mm) for large dogs. Each board is on an angle getting progressively higher with the largest boards maximum height being 250mm. They can be arranged from smallest to highest or the highest board can be in the middle with the slope going both ways for jumping in both directions. The dogs must cross the jump from the front, between the two poles and exiting between the back two poles. Faults are incurred for dislodging the boards or cutting across the boards (not exiting between the back poles). A refusal will be incurred for not attempting the jump or entering from the side (not entering between the front poles).

lolgreengold.gif (2434 bytes)Hoop - Hoops can be either in the form of a lollypop or held within a solid box. The inside diameter of the hoop must be 440mm and the inside must be filled in to avoid the dogs catching their paws. The heights are set at 380mm for small dogs, 570mm for medium dogs and 700mm for large dogs. Missing the jump will incur a refusal.

Spread hurdle - this jump is made up of two bar hurdles. For small dogs the bars are 300mm apart with bar heights of 300mm and 380mm, medium dogs are 450mm apart with bar heights of 450mm and 570mm, for large dogs the bars are 600mm apart with bar heights of 550mm and 700mm. Dislodging the bars will incur a fault missing the jump will result in a refusal being called. 

tablegreengold.gif (2737 bytes)
Table - this obstacle has a 1 metre exclusion zone that the handler may not enter whilst the dog is negotiating the obstacle. The table is 1 metre square with a non slip surface. Table heights are set at 380mm for small dogs, 570mm for medium dogs and 700mm for large dogs. The dogs must jump up onto the table then remain there for 5 full seconds, jumping off the table early will result in a fault plus the dog must get back on the table for a full 5 seconds, a fault will also be given if the handler enters the exclusion zone. If the dog does not jump on the table it will be called a refusal. 

Weaving poles - this obstacle has a 1 metre exclusion zone that the handler may not enter whilst the dog is negotiating the obstacle. There are twelve poles in open set 600mm apart. The poles are 1500mm high and 20 to 40mm in diameter. In open the dogs must enter the first gap with the poles to the dogs left and must weave their way through all the gaps, each gap missed will incur a fault. An incorrect entry will be called a refusal and the dog must re-enter the weavers through the correct gap. 

seesawgreengold.gif (1786 bytes) See Saw - This obstacle is made of a long plank between 3650mm and 4250mm in length. At each end a contact area 1100mm in length. The plank has a centred pivot point with its height from the ground being 1/6th the length of the plank. The dogs must touch the contact area both going up and coming down the see saw, they must not jump off until the plank has tipped and touched the ground. Missing either contact area or jumping off early will incur a penalty. Jumping off before the plank tips or not getting on the see saw will be called a refusal. 

Optional Obstacles:
hurdlegreengold.gif (2066 bytes)Hurdles can be either single bar jumps and solid jumps or in a set called a triple jump (bar - solid - bar jump) - The heights are set at 380mm for small dogs, 570mm for medium dogs and 700mm for large dogs. In the case of single jumps if the bar or any of the solid planks are dislodged the dog will incur a fault, if the dog does not attempt the jump it will be called a refusal.
The triple jump is harder as the dog must do all three jumps in order without dislodging any part of the jump, a fault can be incurred for each part of the jump.

coltulgreengold.gif (3141 bytes)Collapsible tunnel - this tunnel is made from a 44 gallon drum with both ends removed with a four metre "tail" often made of canvas or tarpaulin. The dogs must enter the drum and pass through the tail which will be lying flat on the ground, causing the dogs to push through to get out. Once inside the tunnel the dogs can only exit via the tail turning around and coming out the drum will result in a refusal being called, as will not entering the drum at all. 

bendgreengold2.gif (3561 bytes) Flexible tunnel - this tunnel is made from a concertina type tube a minimum of 3 metres to 6 metres with both ends open. The tunnel is flexible and can be shaped or straight. The dogs must enter through one end as chosen by the judge and exit the other end. 

If the dog negotiates all the obstacles without incurring any course faults, and the handler does not  infringe any exclusion zones or touch the dog or equipment, and the dog crosses the finish line within the standard course time then the dog will have a clear round and shall obtain a qualification towards a title.

Once a dog has five qualifications under at least two different judges the dog will be awarded the title of Agility Dog Excellent and may continue to compete in open or masters. 

Agility Dog Masters please note this is a guide only

Dogs must be at least 18 months old to compete, and must have gained an ADX title. 
In Masters Agility there are 18 - 22 pieces of equipment used, weavers can only be negotiated once, all other obstacles can be negotiated as many times as the judge choses. To gain a title you need to qualify in seven trials under at least three different judges. 
A qualification is obtained by finishing the course within the standard course time without picking up any course faults, this is known as a clear round. 
The standard course time is based on a "rate per metre"  by the number of metres to be covered by the dog, plus five seconds for the time on the table. Eg a course of 100 metres with a SCT of 2.5 mps would mean the dog must complete the course within 45 seconds.
Common rates for SCT in masters range between 2.8 - 3.2 metres per second. 
All course faults incur a 5 second penalty including refusals. Three refusals will result in disqualification, as will the handler bumping the dog to make it take the correct obstacle. Taking an obstacle out of order will result in disqualification.
The dogs are split into three groups depending on their size, small dogs are up to 380mm (dogs such as Shetland Sheepdogs), medium dogs are from 380 to 550mm (such as Border Collies and Kelpies)  and large dogs are over 550mm (such as German Shepherds and Munsterlanders). The equipment used is as follows:

Mandatory Obstacles:
aframegreengold.gif (2961 bytes) Scramble - this obstacle is made up of two planks 2500mm long and 900mm wide. The dog must run up the a-frame go over the top and touch the coloured section on the way down this area is 1100mm up the both sides. Missing the colour on the way down only will incur a fault, missing the obstacle or not making it over the peak will incur a refusal.

Dog walk - The walk is made up of three planks 300 - 330mm wide, the up and down planks are 2500mm long the centre plank is 3500mm long and 1200mm from the ground. At each end of the walk there are three coloured sections red from the start to 450mm, yellow from 450mm to 900mm and blue from 900mm to 1100mm.  Small dogs must touch the red section. medium dogs must touch the red or yellow sections and large dogs must touch either red, yellow or blue on both the way up and the way down. Missing the colours will incur a fault, missing both sets incurs two faults not attempting the obstacle will result in a refusal being called.

longjumpgreengold.gif (2947 bytes) Broad jump - this jump can be made up of three boards (total width 800mm) for small dogs, 4 boards (total width 1200mm) for medium dogs and 5 boards (total width 1500mm) for large dogs. Each board is on an angle getting progressively higher with the largest boards maximum height being 250mm. They can be arranged from smallest to highest or the highest board can be in the middle with the slope going both ways for jumping in both directions. The dogs must cross the jump from the front, between the two poles and exiting between the back two poles. Faults are incurred for dislodging the boards or cutting across the boards (not exiting between the back poles). A refusal will be incurred for not attempting the jump or entering from the side (not entering between the front poles).

lolgreengold.gif (2434 bytes)Hoop - Hoops can be either in the form of a lollypop or held within a solid box. The inside diameter of the hoop must be 440mm and the inside must be filled in to avoid the dogs catching their paws. The heights are set at 380mm for small dogs, 570mm for medium dogs and 700mm for large dogs. Missing the jump will incur a refusal.

Spread hurdle - this jump is made up of two bar hurdles. For small dogs the bars are 300mm apart with bar heights of 300mm and 380mm, medium dogs are 450mm apart with bar heights of 450mm and 570mm, for large dogs the bars are 600mm apart with bar heights of 550mm and 700mm. Dislodging the bars will incur a fault missing the jump will result in a refusal being called. 

Weaving poles - this obstacle has a 1 metre exclusion zone that the handler may not enter whilst the dog is negotiating the obstacle. There are twelve poles in masters set 600mm apart. The poles are 1500mm high and 20 to 40mm in diameter. In masters the dogs must enter the first gap with the poles to the dogs left and must weave their way through all the gaps, each gap missed will incur a fault. An incorrect entry will be called a refusal and the dog must re-enter the weavers through the correct gap. 

Optional Obstacles:

tablegreengold.gif (2737 bytes) Table - this obstacle has a 1 metre exclusion zone that the handler may not enter whilst the dog is negotiating the obstacle. The table is 1 metre square with a non slip surface. Table heights are set at 380mm for small dogs, 570mm for medium dogs and 700mm for large dogs. The dogs must jump up onto the table then remain there for 5 full seconds, jumping off the table early will result in a fault plus the dog must get back on the table for a full 5 seconds, a fault will also be given if the handler enters the exclusion zone. If the dog does not jump on the table it will be called a refusal. 

seesawgreengold.gif (1786 bytes) See Saw - This obstacle is made of a long plank between 3650mm and 4250mm in length. At each end a contact area 1100mm in length. The plank has a centred pivot point with its height from the ground being 1/6th the length of the plank. The dogs must touch the contact area both going up and coming down the see saw, they must not jump off until the plank has tipped and touched the ground. Missing either contact area or jumping off early will incur a penalty. Jumping off before the plank tips or not getting on the see saw will be called a refusal. 

hurdlegreengold.gif (2066 bytes)Hurdles can be either single bar jumps and solid jumps or in a set called a triple jump (bar - solid - bar jump) - The heights are set at 380mm for small dogs, 570mm for medium dogs and 700mm for large dogs. In the case of single jumps if the bar or any of the solid planks are dislodged the dog will incur a fault, if the dog does not attempt the jump it will be called a refusal.
The triple jump is harder as the dog must do all three jumps in order without dislodging any part of the jump, a fault can be incurred for each part of the jump.

coltulgreengold.gif (3141 bytes)Collapsible tunnel - this tunnel is made from a 44 gallon drum with both ends removed with a four metre "tail" often made of canvas or tarpaulin. The dogs must enter the drum and pass through the tail which will be lying flat on the ground, causing the dogs to push through to get out. Once inside the tunnel the dogs can only exit via the tail turning around and coming out the drum will result in a refusal being called, as will not entering the drum at all. 

bendgreengold2.gif (3561 bytes) Flexible tunnel - this tunnel is made from a concertina type tube a minimum of 3 metres to 6 metres with both ends open. The tunnel is flexible and can be shaped or straight. The dogs must enter through one end as chosen by the judge and exit the other end. 

If the dog negotiates all the obstacles without incurring any course faults, and the handler does not  infringe any exclusion zones or touch the dog or equipment, and the dog crosses the finish line within the standard course time then the dog will have a clear round and shall obtain a qualification towards a title.

Once a dog has seven qualifications under at least three different judges the dog will be awarded the title of Agility Dog Masters and may continue to compete in open or masters. 

Jumping Dog please note this is a guide only

Dogs must be at least 18 months old to compete. 
In Novice Jumpers there are 14 -16 pieces of equipment used, each obstacle can only be negotiated once. To gain a title you need to qualify in three trials under at least two different judges. 
A qualification is obtained by finishing the course within the standard course time without picking up any course faults, this is known as a clear round. 
The standard course time is based on a "rate per metre"  by the number of metres to be covered by the dog. Eg a course of 100 metres with a SCT of 3.0 mps would mean the dog must complete the course within 33 seconds.
Common rates for SCT in novice range between 2.8 - 3.3 metres per second. 
All course faults incur a 5 second penalty including refusals. Three refusals will result in disqualification, as will the handler bumping the dog to make it take the correct obstacle. Taking an obstacle out of order will result in disqualification.
The dogs are split into three groups depending on their size, small dogs are up to 380mm (dogs such as Shetland Sheepdogs), medium dogs are from 380 to 550mm (such as Border Collies and Kelpies)  and large dogs are over 550mm (such as German Shepherds and Munsterlanders). The equipment used is as follows:

Mandatory Obstacles:

longjumpgreengold.gif (2947 bytes) Broad jump - this jump can be made up of three boards (total width 800mm) for small dogs, 4 boards (total width 1200mm) for medium dogs and 5 boards (total width 1500mm) for large dogs. Each board is on an angle getting progressively higher with the largest boards maximum height being 250mm. They can be arranged from smallest to highest or the highest board can be in the middle with the slope going both ways for jumping in both directions. The dogs must cross the jump from the front, between the two poles and exiting between the back two poles. Faults are incurred for dislodging the boards or cutting across the boards (not exiting between the back poles). A refusal will be incurred for not attempting the jump or entering from the side (not entering between the front poles).

lolgreengold.gif (2434 bytes)Hoop - Hoops can be either in the form of a lollypop or held within a solid box. The inside diameter of the hoop must be 440mm and the inside must be filled in to avoid the dogs catching their paws. The heights are set at 380mm for small dogs, 570mm for medium dogs and 700mm for large dogs. Missing the jump will incur a refusal.

bendgreengold2.gif (3561 bytes) Flexible tunnel - this tunnel is made from a concertina type tube a minimum of 3 metres to 6 metres with both ends open. The tunnel is flexible and can be shaped or straight. The dogs must enter through one end as chosen by the judge and exit the other end. 

hurdlegreengold.gif (2066 bytes)Hurdles can be either single bar jumps and solid jumps. The heights are set at 380mm for small dogs, 570mm for medium dogs and 700mm for large dogs. In the case of single jumps if the bar or any of the solid planks are dislodged the dog will incur a fault, if the dog does not attempt the jump it will be called a refusal.

Optional Obstacles:
Spread hurdle - this jump is made up of two bar hurdles. For small dogs the bars are 300mm apart with bar heights of 300mm and 380mm, medium dogs are 450mm apart with bar heights of 450mm and 570mm, for large dogs the bars are 600mm apart with bar heights of 550mm and 700mm. Dislodging the bars will incur a fault missing the jump will result in a refusal being called. 

coltulgreengold.gif (3141 bytes)Collapsible tunnel - this tunnel is made from a 44 gallon drum with both ends removed with a four metre "tail" often made of canvas or tarpaulin. The dogs must enter the drum and pass through the tail which will be lying flat on the ground, causing the dogs to push through to get out. Once inside the tunnel the dogs can only exit via the tail turning around and coming out the drum will result in a refusal being called, as will not entering the drum at all. 

If the dog negotiates all the obstacles without incurring any course faults and the dog crosses the finish line within the standard course time then the dog will have a clear round and shall obtain a qualification towards a title.

Once a dog has three qualifications under at least two different judges the dog will be awarded the title of Jumpers Dog and may no longer compete in novice. 

 

Jumping Dog Excellent please note this is a guide only

Dogs must be at least 18 months old to compete, and must have gained an JD title. 
In Open Jumpers there are 16 -18 pieces of equipment used, all obstacles can be negotiated as many times as the judge choses. To gain a title you need to qualify in five trials under at least two different judges. 
A qualification is obtained by finishing the course within the standard course time without picking up any course faults, this is known as a clear round. 
The standard course time is based on a "rate per metre"  by the number of metres to be covered by the dog. Eg a course of 100 metres with a SCT of 3.0 mps would mean the dog must complete the course within 33 seconds.
Common rates for SCT in novice range between 3.4 - 3.9 metres per second.
All course faults incur a 5 second penalty including refusals. Three refusals will result in disqualification, as will the handler bumping the dog to make it take the correct obstacle. Taking an obstacle out of order will result in disqualification.
The dogs are split into three groups depending on their size, small dogs are up to 380mm (dogs such as Shetland Sheepdogs), medium dogs are from 380 to 550mm (such as Border Collies and Kelpies)  and large dogs are over 550mm (such as German Shepherds and Munsterlanders). The equipment used is as follows:

Mandatory Obstacles:

longjumpgreengold.gif (2947 bytes) Broad jump - this jump can be made up of three boards (total width 800mm) for small dogs, 4 boards (total width 1200mm) for medium dogs and 5 boards (total width 1500mm) for large dogs. Each board is on an angle getting progressively higher with the largest boards maximum height being 250mm. They can be arranged from smallest to highest or the highest board can be in the middle with the slope going both ways for jumping in both directions. The dogs must cross the jump from the front, between the two poles and exiting between the back two poles. Faults are incurred for dislodging the boards or cutting across the boards (not exiting between the back poles). A refusal will be incurred for not attempting the jump or entering from the side (not entering between the front poles).

lolgreengold.gif (2434 bytes)Hoop - Hoops can be either in the form of a lollypop or held within a solid box. The inside diameter of the hoop must be 440mm and the inside must be filled in to avoid the dogs catching their paws. The heights are set at 380mm for small dogs, 570mm for medium dogs and 700mm for large dogs. Missing the jump will incur a refusal.

Weaving poles - this obstacle has a 1 metre exclusion zone that the handler may not enter whilst the dog is negotiating the obstacle. There are 8 - 12 poles in open set 600mm apart. The poles are 1500mm high and 20 to 40mm in diameter. 

hurdlegreengold.gif (2066 bytes)Hurdles can be either single bar jumps and solid jumps. The heights are set at 380mm for small dogs, 570mm for medium dogs and 700mm for large dogs. In the case of single jumps if the bar or any of the solid planks are dislodged the dog will incur a fault, if the dog does not attempt the jump it will be called a refusal.

bendgreengold2.gif (3561 bytes) Flexible tunnel - this tunnel is made from a concertina type tube a minimum of 3 metres to 6 metres with both ends open. The tunnel is flexible and can be shaped or straight. The dogs must enter through one end as chosen by the judge and exit the other end. 

Optional Obstacles:
Spread hurdle - this jump is made up of two bar hurdles. For small dogs the bars are 300mm apart with bar heights of 300mm and 380mm, medium dogs are 450mm apart with bar heights of 450mm and 570mm, for large dogs the bars are 600mm apart with bar heights of 550mm and 700mm. Dislodging the bars will incur a fault missing the jump will result in a refusal being called. 

coltulgreengold.gif (3141 bytes)
Collapsible tunnel - this tunnel is made from a 44 gallon drum with both ends removed with a four metre "tail" often made of canvas or tarpaulin. The dogs must enter the drum and pass through the tail which will be lying flat on the ground, causing the dogs to push through to get out. Once inside the tunnel the dogs can only exit via the tail turning around and coming out the drum will result in a refusal being called, as will not entering the drum at all. 

If the dog negotiates all the obstacles without incurring any course faults, and the handler does not  infringe any exclusion zones or touch the dog or equipment, and the dog crosses the finish line within the standard course time then the dog will have a clear round and shall obtain a qualification towards a title.

Once a dog has five qualifications under at least two different judges the dog will be awarded the title of Jumpers Dog Excellent and may continue to compete in open or masters. 

Jumping Dog Masters please note this is a guide only

Dogs must be at least 18 months old to compete, and must have gained an JDX title. 
In Masters Jumpers there are 18 - 20 pieces of equipment used,  all obstacles can be negotiated as many times as the judge choses. To gain a title you need to qualify in seven trials under at least three different judges. 
A qualification is obtained by finishing the course within the standard course time without picking up any course faults, this is known as a clear round. 
The standard course time is based on a "rate per metre"  by the number of metres to be covered by the dog. Eg a course of 100 metres with a SCT of 3.0 mps would mean the dog must complete the course within 33 seconds.
Common rates for SCT in novice range between 4.0 - 4.5 metres per second.
All course faults incur a 5 second penalty including refusals. Three refusals will result in disqualification, as will the handler bumping the dog to make it take the correct obstacle. Taking an obstacle out of order will result in disqualification.
The dogs are split into three groups depending on their size, small dogs are up to 380mm (dogs such as Shetland Sheepdogs), medium dogs are from 380 to 550mm (such as Border Collies and Kelpies)  and large dogs are over 550mm (such as German Shepherds and Munsterlanders). The equipment used is as follows:


longjumpgreengold.gif (2947 bytes) Broad jump - this jump can be made up of three boards (total width 800mm) for small dogs, 4 boards (total width 1200mm) for medium dogs and 5 boards (total width 1500mm) for large dogs. Each board is on an angle getting progressively higher with the largest boards maximum height being 250mm. They can be arranged from smallest to highest or the highest board can be in the middle with the slope going both ways for jumping in both directions. The dogs must cross the jump from the front, between the two poles and exiting between the back two poles. Faults are incurred for dislodging the boards or cutting across the boards (not exiting between the back poles). A refusal will be incurred for not attempting the jump or entering from the side (not entering between the front poles).

lolgreengold.gif (2434 bytes)Hoop - Hoops can be either in the form of a lollypop or held within a solid box. The inside diameter of the hoop must be 440mm and the inside must be filled in to avoid the dogs catching their paws. The heights are set at 380mm for small dogs, 570mm for medium dogs and 700mm for large dogs. Missing the jump will incur a refusal.

Spread hurdle - this jump is made up of two bar hurdles. For small dogs the bars are 300mm apart with bar heights of 300mm and 380mm, medium dogs are 450mm apart with bar heights of 450mm and 570mm, for large dogs the bars are 600mm apart with bar heights of 550mm and 700mm. Dislodging the bars will incur a fault missing the jump will result in a refusal being called. 

Weaving poles - this obstacle has a 1 metre exclusion zone that the handler may not enter whilst the dog is negotiating the obstacle. There are twelve poles in masters set 600mm apart. The poles are 1500mm high and 20 to 40mm in diameter. 

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Hurdles can be either single bar jumps and solid jumps.  The heights are set at 380mm for small dogs, 570mm for medium dogs and 700mm for large dogs. In the case of single jumps if the bar or any of the solid planks are dislodged the dog will incur a fault, if the dog does not attempt the jump it will be called a refusal.

coltulgreengold.gif (3141 bytes)Collapsible tunnel - this tunnel is made from a 44 gallon drum with both ends removed with a four metre "tail" often made of canvas or tarpaulin. The dogs must enter the drum and pass through the tail which will be lying flat on the ground, causing the dogs to push through to get out. Once inside the tunnel the dogs can only exit via the tail turning around and coming out the drum will result in a refusal being called, as will not entering the drum at all. 

bendgreengold2.gif (3561 bytes) Flexible tunnel - this tunnel is made from a concertina type tube a minimum of 3 metres to 6 metres with both ends open. The tunnel is flexible and can be shaped or straight. The dogs must enter through one end as chosen by the judge and exit the other end. 

If the dog negotiates all the obstacles without incurring any course faults and the dog crosses the finish line within the standard course time then the dog will have a clear round and shall obtain a qualification towards a title.

Once a dog has seven qualifications under at least three different judges the dog will be awarded the title of Jumpers Dog Masters and may continue to compete in masters. 

Endurance Test please note this is a guide only

An Endurance Test is a physical test of the dogs structure and fitness. An unsound dog either physically or mentally will struggle to complete this taxing test. Dogs of all breeds and cross breeds between two years and seven years of age are eligible to compete.
The test itself is a 20 km run over at least three surfaces including bitumen, dirt and grass, the test must be completed in 2 hours and 35 minutes including breaks. 
The 20 km run is split into three separate legs, the first being 8km followed by 15 minute vet break, 6km followed by a 20 minute vet break and the final 6km leg and vetting.
Prior to the day of the test the dogs must be examined by their veterinarian who must give a report on the dogs physical condition and ability to compete. On the day of the test immediately prior to the commencement of the first leg and after the completion of each leg the dogs are again vetted to check the temperature, heart rate, pads and general condition. The vet can at any stage during the course of the test eliminate the dogs who are showing undue stress, badly worn pads and temperatures of over 40 degrees centigrade. This vetting process is taken very seriously as at least one dog has died in South Australia a short time after competing in a ET in the late 80s early 90s. 
The dogs themselves compete on a lead approximately 2 metres long attached to either a fixed collar or harness, no check chains are permitted. The handlers may either run or ride a bicycle. At all times the dog and handler must be moving at approximately 10 km per hour. 
Prior to the first leg and after the final vetting the dogs are required to complete a simple heel pattern on or off lead, plus a recall. The purpose of the test is to prove that the dog has the same willingness to work after the test as it did prior to the test. A dog which fails the second obedience section due to lack of physical or mental fitness will be marked as a fail.
All dogs which compete the 20km run within the 2 hours and 35 minute time frame passing all the vet checks and the obedience tests will be marked as a pass. These dogs may then use the letters ET after their name. An endurance test can only be passed once. There are no further levels to the test. 

Qualifying Certificate (Retrieving) please note this is a guide only

A Qualifying Certificate is not a title but may be awarded to any dog competing in a retrieving stake (most commonly novice) at the discretion of the judge. The dog must complete all three retrieves to the judges satisfaction, by proving it is steady to shot, can deliver to hand, is under reasonable control and is not hard mouthed. At least one of the retrieves must be a water run. This certificate can only be awarded once. 

Novice Retrieving Dog please note this is a guide only

Novice Stakes at Retrieving trials are open to all pedigree Gundogs at least six months of age and up that have not gained a NRD title. The dogs are required to run off lead with no collar or chocker chain. The trial consists of not less than three runs and not more than four runs, one of which must be a water run. Each run is supposed to emulate the conditions which would be found whilst shooting live game. The handler in order to fire over the dog must have a gun licence. The dogs must complete each run to the satisfaction of the judge in order to be able to compete in the next run. Ineligible dogs may at the discretion of the judge complete the remaining runs after the competing dogs have completed the run. Trials are usually held in the winter months around lakes and rivers.

The basics of a sighted novice run is as follows:
The handler removes the dogs collar & lead and takes the unloaded gun from the gun steward, the gun must remain open unless otherwise advised by the judge. 
The dog must heel off lead by the handler between the control point and the firing point a distance of at least 10 metres.
Once at the firing point the dog must sit stand or drop and remain steady in that position until directed to retrieve, the handler may now close the gun.
The object to be retrieved will be cast in the dogs view with the aid of a thrower (like a large slingshot).
Whilst the object is in the air the handler must fire at the object (blanks are used, not live ammunition) The dog must remain steady to shot.
On command from the handler the dog will be sent out to retrieve the object, at this point the gun must be broken.
The handler is permitted to instruct the dog from the firing point if required but must not leave the confines of the firing point. Points may be deducted for giving instructions or the dog ignoring those instructions.
Once the object is found it must be returned to the handler at a similar speed to which the dog was working.
When the dog reaches the handler it must sit or stand and deliver the object unresistingly to hand.
The dog must again heel by the handler back to the control point where the handler shall give the gun back to the gun steward and the object to the judge for examination.

Each run is scored out of 55 points, 10 for steadiness, obedience and walking to heel, 10 points for style, eagerness and action, and 35 points for the actual retrieve. 
However up to 5 points can be deducted for each of the following:
Blinking and over-running game, pottering, giving tongue, dropping game and the handler not firing from the shoulder.
Also up to 10 points can be deducted for each of the following: 
Breaking to shot, hard mouth and failure to obey a command or direction.
The total score being the points gained for the retrieve less the deductions.

The dogs that finish the trial have their scores for all three or four runs added together. The first placed dog gains a leg towards its Novice Retrieving Dog title, second and third places are also awarded but do not count towards a title. Once a dog has three first places it will be awarded the title of Novice Retrieving Dog.

Restricted Retrieving Dog please note this is a guide only

Restricted Stakes at Retrieving trials are open to all pedigree Gundogs at least six months of age and up. that have not won three Restricted stakes. won an All Age stake or placed first or second in a Championship stake. The dogs are required to run off lead with no collar or chocker chain. The trial consists of three runs, one of which must be a water run. Each run is supposed to emulate the conditions which would be found whilst shooting live game. The handler in order to fire over the dog must have a gun licence. The dogs must complete each run to the satisfaction of the judge in order to be able to compete in the next run. Ineligible dogs may at the discretion of the judge complete the remaining runs after the competing dogs have completed the run. Trials are usually held in the winter months around lakes and rivers.

The type of retrieves that may be set by the judge include:
A single mark - where one object to be retrieved is cast via a thrower (similar to a large slingshot) in full view of the dog which must mark the fall of the object then go out and retrieve it.

A walk up retrieve - where the object to be retrieved is cast whilst the handler and dog are walking between the control and firing points. The dog must either sit stand or drop whilst the handler pauses to fire at the object. The dog is then sent to retrieve the object.

Wounded (bird or rabbit) retrieve - the object to be retrieved is dragged by a line for a distance of at least 20 metres, the attached object is removed and replaced with a fresh one before the dog is sent.

Blind retrieve - the object to be retrieved is placed in an area by a steward without the dog being able to mark the location of the object. Prior to the run the handlers are advised of the area where the object can be found. After firing the gun the dog is sent out using the handlers directions to the area where the object can be found, from this point it must use its nose or eyes to find the object.

Double retrieves - there are two objects to be retrieved. Combinations of any of the above retrieves such as two marked or two blind retrieves can be used and the judge can decide which order the dog must retrieve the objects. 

Double rise retrieve - the first object to be retrieved is cast to a point, the handler must fire twice at the object. The dog is then sent to retrieve the first object, as the dog is returning with the first retrieve a second object is placed approximately 10 metres from where the first object fell. The dog after delivering the first object to hand must go back and retrieve the second object without direction from the handler as it would get in a blind.

Two bird retrieve - The first object is cast and fired at, the dog is sent out to retrieve the object. As the dog returns with the first object a second object is cast in the dogs view, which the handler must fire at. The dog must deliver the first retrieve then go out to where it marked the fall of the second. The second object should be between 20 and 40 metres from where the first object fell.

Triple retrieves - there are three objects to be retrieved. Combinations of many of the above retrieves such as two marks and one blind or two blinds and one mark can be selected by the judge. The judge can also decide the order that the three objects must be retrieved in.

Each run is scored out of 55 points, 10 for steadiness, obedience and walking to heel, 10 points for style, eagerness and action, and 35 points for the actual retrieve. 
However up to 5 points can be deducted for each of the following:
Blinking and over-running game, pottering, giving tongue, dropping game and the handler not firing from the shoulder.
Also up to 10 points can be deducted for each of the following: 
Breaking to shot, hard mouth and failure to obey a command or direction.
The total score being the points gained for the retrieve less the deductions.

The dogs that finish the trial have their scores for all three runs added together. The first placed dog gains a leg towards its Restricted Retrieving Dog title, second and third places are also awarded but do not count towards a title. Once a dog has three first places in a Restricted Stake it will be awarded the title of Restricted Retrieving Dog.

Retrieving Champion please note this is a guide only

All Age Stakes at Retrieving trials are open to all pedigree Gundogs at least six months of age and up that have won a Novice stake or placed first, second or third in a Restricted stake. The dogs are required to run off lead with no collar or chocker chain. The trial consists of three runs, one of which must be a blind retrieve. Each run is supposed to emulate the conditions which would be found whilst shooting live game. The handler in order to fire over the dog must have a gun licence. The dogs must complete each run to the satisfaction of the judge in order to be able to compete in the next run. Ineligible dogs may at the discretion of the judge complete the remaining runs after the competing dogs have completed the run. Trials are usually held in the winter months around lakes and rivers.

A walk up retrieve - where the object to be retrieved is cast whilst the handler and dog are walking between the control and firing points. The dog must either sit stand or drop whilst the handler pauses to fire at the object. The dog is then sent to retrieve the object.

Wounded (bird or rabbit) retrieve - the object to be retrieved is dragged by a line for a distance of at least 20 metres, the attached object is removed and replaced with a fresh one before the dog is sent.

Blind retrieve - the object to be retrieved is placed in an area by a steward without the dog being able to mark the location of the object. Prior to the run the handlers are advised of the area where the object can be found. After firing the gun the dog is sent out using the handlers directions to the area where the object can be found, from this point it must use its nose or eyes to find the object.

Double retrieves - there are two objects to be retrieved. Combinations of any of the above retrieves such as two marked or two blind retrieves can be used and the judge can decide which order the dog must retrieve the objects. 

Double rise retrieve - the first object to be retrieved is cast to a point, the handler must fire twice at the object. The dog is then sent to retrieve the first object, as the dog is returning with the first retrieve a second object is placed approximately 10 metres from where the first object fell. The dog after delivering the first object to hand must go back and retrieve the second object without direction from the handler as it would get in a blind.

Two bird retrieve - The first object is cast and fired at, the dog is sent out to retrieve the object. As the dog returns with the first object a second object is cast in the dogs view, which the handler must fire at. The dog must deliver the first retrieve then go out to where it marked the fall of the second. The second object should be between 20 and 40 metres from where the first object fell.

Triple retrieves - there are three objects to be retrieved. Combinations of many of the above retrieves such as two marks and one blind or two blinds and one mark can be selected by the judge. The judge can also decide the order that the three objects must be retrieved in.

Double fall retrieve - The first object is cast and fired at, as the dog is sent out to retrieve the first object a second object is cast in the dogs view, which the handler must fire at. The dog must retrieve deliver the first object then go out to where it marked the fall of the second. The second object should be between 20 and 40 metres from where the first object fell.

Each run is scored out of 55 points, 10 for steadiness, obedience and walking to heel, 10 points for style, eagerness and action, and 35 points for the actual retrieve. 
However up to 5 points can be deducted for each of the following:
Blinking and over-running game, pottering, giving tongue, dropping game and the handler not firing from the shoulder.
Also up to 10 points can be deducted for each of the following: 
Breaking to shot, hard mouth and failure to obey a command or direction.
The total score being the points gained for the retrieve less the deductions.

The dogs that finish the trial have their scores for all three runs added together. The first placed dog gains six points towards the Retrieving Champion title, second and third places are also awarded but do not count towards a title. Once a dog has gained twelve points by winning two All Age Stakes, placing second in two Championship Stakes (worth 6 points each) or winning one Championship Stake (worth 12 points) it will be awarded the title of Retrieving Champion.

Qualifying Certificate (Field) please note this is a guide only

A Qualifying Certificate is not a title but may be awarded to any dog competing in a Field Trial stake (most commonly novice) at the discretion of the judge. The dog must have shown it is not gun shy, that it will hunt, face cover, point and retrieve game tenderly from or across water, steadiness not being essential. The dog must have been shot over.  This certificate can only be awarded once.                                  

(Utility Gundog) Novice Field Dog please note this is a guide only

Utility Field trials are open to the following breeds: Brittany, German Shorthaired Pointer, German  Wirehaired Pointer, Italian Spinone, Large Munsterlander, Hungarian Vizsla, Weimaraner and Weimaraner Long hair. Wherever possible trials are conducted using quail. The shooting and game laws in the state the trial is held in must be abided by all competitors. 

There are four levels of competition. Novice stakes are for dogs over six months that have not won more than one other Novice stake or won/placed in a higher stake.
Open stakes for all dogs over six months. All Age and Championship stakes for all dogs that have won or placed in at least one Novice/Open/All Age/Championship stake).   

Prior to the commencement of the trial a draw is done to decide the order that the dogs must compete and which dogs will be paired off. The dogs are required to wear collars whilst competing, a red collar for the first dog drawn and a white collar for the second dog drawn in each pair.

There are at least three runs in each trial, the first two runs are in the field working in pairs, the third (and possibly forth) run being a sighted or blind water retrieve similar to a water run in retrieving trials. 

During the field runs the two dogs are required to work an area as prescribed by the judge with both handlers and the steward if the steward is shooting for either of the handlers.
The dogs must work the area using their senses to locate the game. On finding game the dog which finds it must point staunchly, unless the game moves in which case the dog may follow and keep contact. If one dog points game the other dog must back the first dog. (Backing is when the second dog must honor the first dogs point by adopting a point where it is, without trying to encroach on the space of the first dog or interfere with its work.) When commanded to flush the game the first dog to point must road or flush the game out so it may be shot by the handler or steward. During this the second dog must remain steady, and once the game has been shot both dogs must remain steady until the judge orders for the game to be retrieved. 

The game must be retrieved and delivered to hand. Breaking to shot or refusing to pick up the game once it is found and chasing the game are grounds for elimination, not finding the shot game will attract a penalty. It is possible that the dogs may be paired against different dogs in the second run at the discretion of the judge, if they wish to see different aspects of the dogs work.

The third (and/or fourth) run shall be a sighted or blind water retrieve.
The object to be retrieved will be cast in the dogs view (for a sighted) with the aid of a thrower (like a large slingshot) either into water or across water. Whilst the object is in the air the handler must fire at the object (blanks are used, not live ammunition) The dog must remain steady to shot.
On command from the handler the dog will be sent out to retrieve the object.
Once the object is retrieved it must be returned to the handler.
When the dog reaches the handler it must sit or stand and deliver the object unresistingly to hand.

The dogs are scored out of a maximum of 240 points, 200 for the field work (100 points each run) and 40 points for the water run. In the field work for each run 10 points may be gained for ground treatment, steadiness, style and handling & control, 15 points for pointing, the retrieve and game finding ability, 5 points for facing cover and 20 points for backing. In the water run/s a maximum of 40 points may be gained, 10 points for steadiness & obedience and style & eagerness and 20 points for the actual retrieve. 

At the end of the trial all the competing dogs scores are totalled and the top three dogs are placed according to their scores. Depending on the stake being held the points awarded to the placed dogs are as follows:
Novice stake - 1st  - 2 points, 2nd - 1 point
Open stake - 1st - 5 points, 2nd - 3 points
All Age stake - 1st - 5 points, 2nd - 3 points
Championship stake - 1st - 10 points, 2nd - 5 points 

Dogs will be awarded the title of Novice Field Dog once they have won two Novice stakes or have won or placed in a higher stake (Open, All Age or Championship).
 

(Utility Gundog) Field Champion please note this is a guide only

Utility Field trials are open to the following breeds: Brittany, German Shorthaired Pointer, German  Wirehaired Pointer, Italian Spinone, Large Munsterlander, Hungarian Vizsla, Weimaraner and Weimaraner Long hair. Wherever possible trials are conducted using quail. The shooting and game laws in the state the trial is held in must be abided by all competitors. 

There are four levels of competition. Novice stakes are for dogs over six months that have not won more than one other Novice stake or won/placed in a higher stake.
Open for all dogs over six months. All Age and Championship stakes for all dogs that have won or placed in at least one Novice/Open/All Age/Championship stake.   

Prior to the commencement of the trial a draw is done to decide the order that the dogs must compete and which dogs will be paired off. The dogs are required to wear collars whilst competing, a red collar for the first dog drawn and a white collar for the second dog drawn in each pair.

There are at least three runs in each trial, the first two runs are in the field working in pairs, the third (and possibly fourth) run being a water retrieve similar to a sighted or blind water run in retrieving trials. 

During the field runs the two dogs are required to work an area as prescribed by the judge with both handlers and the steward if the steward is shooting for either of the handlers.
The dogs must work the area using their senses to locate the game. On finding game the dog which finds it must point staunchly, unless the game moves in which case the dog may follow and keep contact. If one dog points game the other dog must back the first dog. (Backing is when the second dog must honor the first dogs point by adopting a point where it is, without trying to encroach on the space of the first dog or interfere with its work.) When commanded to flush the game the first dog to point must road or flush the game out so it may be shot by the handler or steward. During this the second dog must remain steady, and once the game has been shot both dogs must remain steady until the judge orders for the game to be retrieved. 

The game must be retrieved and delivered to hand. Breaking to shot or refusing to pick up the game once it is found and chasing game are grounds for elimination, not finding the shot game will attract a penalty. It is possible that the dogs may be paired against different dogs in the second run at the discretion of the judge, if they wish to see different aspects of the dogs work.

The third (and/or fourth) run shall be a sighted water retrieve. The object to be retrieved will be cast in the dogs view (for a sighted) with the aid of a thrower (like a large slingshot) either into water or across water. Whilst the object is in the air the handler must fire at the object (blanks are used, not live ammunition) The dog must remain steady to shot.
On command from the handler the dog will be sent out to retrieve the object.
Once the object is retrieved it must be returned to the handler.
When the dog reaches the handler it must sit or stand and deliver the object unresistingly to hand.

The dogs are scored out of a maximum of 240 points, 200 for the field work (100 points each run) and 40 points for the water run. In the field work for each run 10 points may be gained for ground treatment, steadiness, style and handling & control, 15 points for pointing, the retrieve and game finding ability, 5 points for facing cover and 20 points for backing. In the water run/s a maximum of 40 points may be gained, 10 points for steadiness & obedience and style & eagerness and 20 points for the actual retrieve. 

At the end of the trial all the competing dogs scores are totalled and the top three dogs are placed according to their scores. Depending on the stake being held the points awarded to the placed dogs are as follows:
Novice stake - 1st  - 2 points, 2nd - 1 point
Open stake - 1st - 5 points, 2nd - 3 points
All Age stake - 1st - 5 points, 2nd - 3 points
Championship stake - 1st - 10 points, 2nd - 5 points 

Dogs will be awarded the title of Field Trial Champion once the dog has gained at least 10 championship points by either winning one Championship stake or any other combination of wins or places to gain the 10 points as long as at least five points were gained in one stake.

 

 

Page Title                                  Last Updated

Breed Standard                                  11th April 2001Kyle_and_Alex_2.JPG (120373 bytes)

Breed History                                      18th April 2001

Living with a Large Munsterlander     4th May 2001

About Mistypoint Kennels                   11th April 2001

Meet my dogs                                    25th February 2002

Next litter due                                    30th April 2002

Roll of Honor                                      1st Sept 2001

How titles are gained in Australia      13th August 2001

More Munsterlander Pictures              4th May 2001

Group pictures                                    26th January 2002

Pets as therapy                                   19th April 2001

Agility Photo's                                     4th May 2001

Retrieving & Field                               29th April 2001

Obedience Photo's                             21st October 2001 

Previous litters                                   13th August 2001

Xmas Pictures                                    11th April 2001

Small Munsterlander                          18th April 2001

Links                                                   13th August 2001

Guestbook                                           4th May 2001

Web Rings                                          11th April 2001


 

Please note the pictures I have used are mostly ones that I own, or have taken at shows. Other photos I have been given permission to use (if they were not my photo's) either by having the photo sent to me or copying it from the persons website. There are some photo's of dogs I particularly like that I have also included, if you own these dogs in question and do not wish them to be included please let me know & I will remove the picture immediately. Also if I have included a picture of your dog I have taken at a show and you want it updated with a picture you prefer please send it to me and I will change over the photo.  If I have listed your dogs name in the Roll of Honor and you wish to add a photo e-mail me a jpeg picture or e-mail me for my postal address.   

Should you wish to use any pictures included on these pages (unless you own the dog) please contact me before copying them.  The little "Munster on point"  was created by and is owned by Tracie Edwards. 

All details included in the breed history has been gained from reading many articles, and collating the most common reports. Should you feel you have a more accurate recount of the breeds history please contact me so I can rectify any errors.